Artist InterviewsArtistATWorkNewArtistATWork: JKJ – Pittsburgh, PA

IMIL ManagementSeptember 15, 2014

Welcome to our show, where we cover one of our featured Artist AT Work. This episode we interview JKJ of Pittsburgh’s Rare Nation as he preps a new song for his next mixtape.

Bio:
Music, really great music, is sparked from life experience or raw emotion. It is through this emotion and the soundscapes it creates that musicians and fans alike are able to connect. And it is through this emotion that Pittsburgh hip hop artist JKJ finds his musical strength. JKJ is an artist whose message is focused on social commentary, intelligent discussion, and his own life experiences, with a versatility that allows him to execute effectively over anything from dark, soulful samples to powerful, guitar-driven rock influences.

With a style self-described as “Positive Aggression,” JKJ paints pictures of today’s society using insightful observations and a great storytelling ability. His music provokes inspired thinking and encourages exercising free will, while being both entertaining and applicable to a wide range of emotions and situations. If you are looking for a party-rapper, JKJ isn’t necessarily your guy. But if you want a unique sound and some deep, powerfully visual rhymes, JKJ will more than meet your expectations.

Before JKJ made the move to R.A.R.E. Nation in August 2013, he had built a solid foundation with blossoming East Coast rap collective, Wonder HitZ, with which he released six projects in two years, including a collaborative mixtape with R.A.R.E. Nation’s founder, Palermo Stone. Boasting an impressive musical catalogue, wonderfully interactive live show, strong chemistry with Palermo and veteran leadership as an artist, JKJ is a natural fit for the R.A.R.E. label. His R.A.R.E. Nation full-length debut entitled Jordan was released April 9th, 2014.
“Music is something that is a part of every single culture on this planet. The messages and content all vary, but to me, music speaks to the soul. My goal is to bring substance and emotion back to music because I feel these are things that have been absent for a long time. I want my music to resonate through the soul and provoke enlightenment for all. I want you to feel what I feel—every time I step in the booth.” – JKJ